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Malaysia seeks deportation of ladyboy from Thailand


Quietguy
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On 9/22/2021 at 7:04 PM, Fenton said:

She is also involved in fraud according to the media. So deserves to be deported and face trial.

The 'fraud' is apparently altering an ID card. I assume it is hers and she altered it to change her name and gender. The Malaysian authorities say it is not a serious matter. She has not been charged with fraud, and Malaysia says she is needed as a 'victim and a witness' in that matter.

The main charge is dressing as a woman contrary to Sharia law, for which she faces three years imprisonment. Subsequent charges have been brought of resisting arrest and/or assaulting Sharia officers, which apparently are because she struggled with Sharia officers who arrested her.

Nur Sajat has been detained for deportation by the Thai authorities, but is appealing that decision and is seeking asylum in Australia. 

https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2021/06/15/cops-nur-sajat-sought-as-both-witness-and-victim-in-fraud-case

 

 

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59 minutes ago, Quietguy said:

The 'fraud' is apparently altering an ID card. I assume it is hers and she altered it to change her name and gender. The Malaysian authorities say it is not a serious matter. She has not been charged with fraud, and Malaysia says she is needed as a 'victim and a witness' in that matter.

The main charge is dressing as a woman contrary to Sharia law, for which she faces three years imprisonment. Subsequent charges have been brought of resisting arrest and/or assaulting Sharia officers, which apparently are because she struggled with Sharia officers who arrested her.

Nur Sajat has been detained for deportation by the Thai authorities, but is appealing that decision and is seeking asylum in Australia. 

https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2021/06/15/cops-nur-sajat-sought-as-both-witness-and-victim-in-fraud-case

 

 

Screenshot 2021-10-01 13.11.55.png

Still Fraud albeit, changing her details on her ID. 

Surprisingly in some Muslim countries (Iran, strangely enough) if they have SRS, life is better for them. But not much.

Obviously being a muslim herself or considers herself an apostate maybe but doubtful, she should of stayed away because she was fully aware of the consequences if she was caught.

Having a her own business their she seemed to be tolerated ( but that is not acceptance ).

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On 9/22/2021 at 7:04 PM, Fenton said:

She is also involved in fraud according to the media. So deserves to be deported and face trial.

1 hour ago, Fenton said:

Still Fraud albeit, changing her details on her ID. 

She was not charged with 'fraud'. Malaysia probably has different laws but in most countries criminal fraud would involve intent to obtaining money, goods or services by deception. There would be a victim or victims.

Malaysia was not seeking her deportation for 'fraud' but for dressing as a woman.

I would have thought anyone who likes ladyboys would have some sympathy for her situation.

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1 hour ago, Quietguy said:

She was not charged with 'fraud'. Malaysia probably has different laws but in most countries criminal fraud would involve intent to obtaining money, goods or services by deception. There would be a victim or victims.

Malaysia was not seeking her deportation for 'fraud' but for dressing as a woman.

I would have thought anyone who likes ladyboys would have some sympathy for her situation.

Right is right.

Wrong is wrong.

She was born in a muslim country and she knew exactly what the consequences were.

Yes I do have some empathy. The law is the law.

When in Rome do what the Romans do, otherwise face the barbaric consequences. Which she knows only to well because she was in her 30's. 

Malaysia is a muslim country, considered more tolerant than most. What do you think would of happened if this scenario had played out in Saudi?

Set up a go fund me page if you feel so strongly about it. Put yer money where your mouth is!

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2 hours ago, Fenton said:

The law is the law.

When in Rome do what the Romans do, otherwise face the barbaric consequences.

Engaging in prostitution is against the law in los, and in the Phillipines which I think you've said you visit.

Do you obey it?

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47 minutes ago, Quietguy said:

Engaging in prostitution is against the law in los. Do you obey it?

So WTF has that got to do bonking an LB in Thailand? Nowt!. Its not a muslim country. 

Altering your ID (a government document). Even in some if not all countries in the EU you would be fucked for that. France is very strict with ID's for example.

Attending a muslim festival dressed as a woman breaching Sharia law?

Clutching at straws aren't we!

Yes your avatar suits you, a little reptile who changes his colours when the need arises.

 

 

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1 hour ago, blind boy grunt said:

is there any need for that comment? QG is a good guy

Yes

She did what she did in Malaysia and dragging illicit liasons conducted in Thailand is not relevant or pertinent to the discussion.

Good guy? Yes in your eyes and obviously you know him well.

As for me, the jury is still out and neither will I be wearing a black cap.

 

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Having visited Maysia a few years ago (November 2014 to be exact)  I tried to find out about laws in the country. I prefer to tell that no one knows about Malaysian laws unless he is a lawyer in Kuala Lumpur. I believed that drinking alcohol was prohibited but I found country fellows I had met during the flight to KL drinking alcohol in a whisky bar. 

A large majority of people are muslims, 25 % of Chinese descent, 10 % of Indian descent and still a few people of British descent. Muslim laws must be respected by Muslim people but not all the times by non Muslim people. This is why the status of ladyboys is really ambiguous. I won't explore details that I ignore but roughly, non muslim malaysian will be less disturbed by prosecutions than Muslim Malaysians. While Muslim ladyboys  are persecuted, Thai and Pinoy ladyboys are accepted with tourists visas and practice "escorting" discreetly in the main cities. 

Another aspect is the way law is enforced. More than many other countries, laws are enforced if authorities are interested  in enforcing laws. So non muslims may drink alcohol but I was told of a British tourist getting drunk then insulting Malaysian people as British do in Thailand (since they seem to believe that being drunk is an excuse to disrespect others). Malaysian guys beat him up and the British guy went to the police to file a complaint. The Malaysian police disregarded him since he had told Malaysian muslims to fuck off first. 

Just my 2 cents : this ladyboy is being prosecuted since she became a small celebrity ans was seen wearing female wears. Muslims can't accept it. Moreover, she is making business and seems to make money. 
If I remember well, I had posted in my TR that the master word in Malaysia is discretion. 

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6 hours ago, Fenton said:

The law is the law.

  So which is it? A law in Thailand isn't to break just because it isn't a muslim country. Do you break laws in Thailand?

4 hours ago, Quietguy said:

Engaging in prostitution is against the law in los, and in the Phillipines which I think you've said you visit.

Do you obey it?

 

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1 hour ago, seven said:

  So which is it? A law in Thailand isn't to break just because it isn't a muslim country. Do you break laws in Thailand?

 

Its Malaysia, which is the whole point of the thread and I have not broken the Law in said country, she has (twice!)

 

 

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8 hours ago, Fenton said:

Its Malaysia, which is the whole point of the thread and I have not broken the Law in said country, she has (twice!)

 

 

I would think the point of the thread is should/will Thailand extradite her.

A couple years ago there was another interesting extradition case not having to do with transgenders.  She was not forced to go back to Saudi Arabia or Kuwait. 

A Saudi woman says she was fleeing her abusive family and has been stopped in Thailand. Noel King talks Phil Robertson, who is deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch.  Transcript below:

NOEL KING, HOST:

We're following a developing story out of Thailand today. A young Saudi Arabian woman who says she fled her family in hear of her life is now under the U.N. refugee agency's protection. Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun is 18 years old. She flew to Thailand, then planned to fly onward to Australia and seek asylum. Thai authorities had her detained at an airport hotel. She's since tweeted that she's heard her father has arrived in Thailand and that it, quote, "worried and scared her." Phil Robertson has spoken to this young woman. He's deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch. Good morning.

PHIL ROBERTSON: Good morning.

KING: So this young woman was supposed to be put on a flight to Kuwait, where her family is vacationing. That did not happen this morning. So where do things stand for her right now?

ROBERTSON: She is saying that she wants to apply for political asylum. She is deathly afraid of going back to Saudi Arabia. She believes that if she does that - she said multiple times that she will be killed. And she has a long list of abuses that she's suffered previously to point to, to back that contention up.

KING: You've been talking to her. What specifically is she saying about the abuse within her family?

ROBERTSON: It was both psychological and physical abuse. The abuse included beatings, included things like, you know, confining her for cutting her hair or for demanding certain things that she wanted to do. She's also said very clearly that she is not enamored of Islam, does not want to wear the hijab and does not want to go to pray. And so, of course, that puts her in a very dangerous situation in Saudi Arabia potentially with the government, in addition to her family.

KING: Hence, probably, the application for political asylum, which is less to do with family stuff and more to do with, is this person in danger in their country? - what kind of spirits is she in?

ROBERTSON: She's determined. She's frankly quite courageous. But she's tired.

KING: Yeah.

ROBERTSON: And she's hungry. She's locked herself in this room since about 8:30 in the morning Bangkok time. And so it is - it's been an all-day ordeal. And it's been highs and lows. There's been people at her door. There's been people trying to trick her, saying open the door. It's Human Rights Watch. Open the door. It's UNHCR. You know, there's all sorts of games being played.

KING: Which brings us to a big question - what is the government there in Bangkok saying? And what is the Saudi government saying at this point?

ROBERTSON: Well, the Saudi government is trying to claim that they have nothing to do with this and that this is all somebody else's doing. But the reality is it was their official who met the plane, you know, as she got off the plane and seized her passport. You know, why that official was allowed to walk around in a closed area of the Bangkok airport is beyond me. But that's happened. For the Thais, they're sort of changing their story now as the pressure comes on. The latest is that the immigration commissioner says he's not going to send her back. But, previously, he was saying yes. It's the family member. Why's she so scared? She should go back now.

KING: So you'll be keeping a close eye on this one, I imagine. Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch, thank you so much.

ROBERTSON: Thank you.

 

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4 hours ago, Pdoggg said:

I would think the point of the thread is should/will Thailand extradite her.

That was the original point of the thread, but it got somewhat derailed.

According to Human Rights Watch (mentioned in above post) the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has granted Nur Sajat refugee status. The UNHCR will not comment on this, but assuming it is true they will be looking for a country to take her in. I believe Australia might be the most likely. 

Screenshot 2021-10-02 11.38.22.png

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1 hour ago, Quietguy said:

According to Human Rights Watch (mentioned in above post) the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has granted Nur Sajat refugee status. The UNHCR will not comment on this, but assuming it is true they will be looking for a country to take her in. I believe Australia might be the most likely. 

Good to read, let's hope it's true and She is indeed taken in by Australia.

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